Ethics in Everyday Life: I’m Thinking You’re Protesting Waaaay Too Much, Part Two.

Two months after my “Rescind*” (see below) post on the LinkedIn group—and 6 weeks after I’d stopped following the discussion, I opened my e-mail to find the following in my InBox:

@Linda Snyder

@Any of you judging somebody else who may have been at their wits end and made a decision, and got caught. @ Any of you who believe “a lie is a lie” no matter what?
If we were talking The Good Book here, yes a little sin is the same as a big sin, but we are not, are we?

For example, I am sure none of you judgmental people have EVER done any of the following:

1) Called in sick to work when you were not sick?

2) Told the boss you had a doctor appointment to leave early so you could attend the opening of the first baseball game of the season?

3) Never cheated on your taxes in even the smallest of ways? Perhaps increased your donation amount from $25 to $125? Or you 1099ers- Perhaps you claimed a piece of furniture as office furniture in setting up your office when it was really a piece of furniture for your living room?

4) Never cheated on your expense report by claiming dinner to be $24 instead of $14 because your company doesn’t require receipts for anything under $25?

5) Never kept your child out of school for a reason other than sickness, and then the next day wrote a note to the school saying your child had been out sick making your child an accessory to the lie? (What was that I read about collusion?)

6) Used the company vehicle or company gas card for anything other than purely business travel?

7) Lied on your drivers license about your weight?

8  Told a family member, friend, or neighbor that you were not feeling well when you were perfectly fine just to get out of attending some event?

9) Padded your salary when you applied for a job at any time in your career? (I realize one sex will identify with this more so than the other for obvious reasons.)

10) Told someone how nice they looked when you didn’t believe it to really be true?

11) Responded “Not tonight. I’ve got a headache”?

Who are you trying to kid? Yourself? Use your head. People in positions to hire people are supposed to have the ability to use good judgment. Look at the person, speak to the person, examine the circumstances and do the right thing for that situation. It’s called situational leadership. It’s a matter of degree. Use your head and maybe some good old-fashioned common sense.

Everything is black and white. Right? Tell me Linda, will you do any of these things again?

This was written by someone I don’t know—someone I’m not connected to— who identifies herself as a human resources professional. 

When I first received this e-mail, my hackles went up.  My immediate reaction was “What is your problem?!  Are you some kind of idiot?”(not a very compassionate response on my part but after all, I felt like I’d just been assaulted out of the blue) – which I’m sure was not the reaction she was hoping for.  Most likely, she believed that her abrupt and far too harsh missive (which she also posted on the LinkedIn discussion itself) would “wake up” those of us who obviously were being hypocritical about our own failings.

I didn’t respond.  It seems clear that anyone who would violate my In Box this way really doesn’t care what I think. 

A goddess does not behave in such a fashion. 

(*“You’ve offered a job to an applicant who stated she was still working for her former employer. It turns out she was let go (not for performance reasons), and is NOT employed by them.  She apologizes, saying she didn’t want her current unemployment to be a factor in the decision of whether to hire her or not.  Would you rescind the job offer?”)

 

Goddess Entrepreneur / The Sisu Project….

The only consultant & motivational speaker around to use Finnish mythology, hair-raising anecdotes, oddball humor and solid business principles to reach & teach your audience in the areas of leadership, ethics, guts, courage—and a simpler way of life. 

www.facebook.com/goddessentrepreneur

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: